Search Results for -
Product Type: Toys
Age: Late Elementary School Years
Categories: Games
Subcategories: Math Games and Equipment

 


2014 Award
Gamewright Qwixx
(Gamewright $12 Score:)

Of the new games from Gamewright this season, Qwixx is the most challenging but ultimately our testers liked it  once they got the hang of the game play. The set comes with six dice, two white, one red, one, blue, one green and one yellow.  The color of dice is important to how the game works.  The set also comes with 100 score sheets that have numbers that are color-coded.

The "active" player first rolls the two white dice.  The player then takes that number and crosses it out on one of the color-coded lines.  Other players can follow suit but they are not required to do so. The active player combines one of the white die with one of the colored die. That number and color is then marked off on the corresponding line. Other players can again do the same, but are not required to do so. The dice then passes to the next player.

What complicates the game is that once you mark off a number on the color-coded grid you can not mark off any future number to the left of that number. Trust me, this makes sense and adds to the challenge of the game.  There will be times when you can't mark any numbers off-- you then have to check off the penalty box. If you mark off all four penalty boxes, the round is over.

At the end of the game points are given for the number of marks on each line. The penalties are taken off your score. The player with the highest score wins.

While this is marked for 8 & up, we'd say more like 10 and up unless your child is very at ease with dice/math games.

Age: Later School Years, Tweens. Award Year: 2014.

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2014 Award
Gamewright Dodge Dice
(Gamewright $12 Score:)

Unlike many dice games, the goal in Dodge Dice is to avoid points. The game comes with 10 dice. One is the "penalty" points die that tells you how many points you'll get if the round doesn't go your way. There is also an action die that makes things happen like all your points are doubled or tripled (not good!) or you can pass all the points to another player (mean but good!).  There are also skip chips that allow you to avoid the penalty points. Marked for 8 & up and designed for 2-6 players. Rounds will be fast. Our testers thought this was a fun twist on traditional dice games.

 

Age: Early School Years, Later School Years. Award Year: 2014.

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2012 Award
Who's Counting?
(Teacher’s Professional Resources $24.99 Score:)

Unlike a lot of math equation card games, this one has a little story built in that involves the Whozits and the danger of being destroyed by the Green Goo. Players do their best to stop the advance of the Green Goo by making equations—but watch out. Your opponent can snap a negative card on your card and change everything! There are steal cards, too! There are lots of rules, opportunities to use all four operations, as in addition, subtractions, multiplication and division. Once players have the hang of it, strategy can step in and save the Whozits in Wherezit. 8 & up.

Age: Early School Years, Later School Years. Award Year: 2012.

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2012 Award
Sumology: The Game of Equations
(SimplyFun $40 Score:)

An entertaining game played with wooden tiles that might be called, Scrabble meets Math. Begin by drawing 8 tiles. Instead of creating words with your tiles, the object is to build equations in a crossword style, horizontally or vertically. You need to connect your new equation to the other tiles on the table and then you can add up the digits in your equation to get your score. The game uses all four basic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 8 & up.

Age: Later School Years, Tweens, Teens. Award Year: 2012.

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Awards
Unifix Ready for Math Kit
(Didax $24 Score:) Beginning math students use these cubes, book, and stickers for understanding early math concepts.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: .

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Awards
Primary Time Teacher Learning Clock Junior
(Learning Resources $14.95 Score:) As kids move the minute hand, the synchronized and color-coded digital display also tells the time in 5-minute increments.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: .

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2002 Awards
Countdown
(Cadaco $15.99 Score:) Hands down, one of the best math games ever! A quick two player game that can be played by kids of mixed ages and math ability. It's played with dice on an uncomplicated wooden board. Each player has 10 wooden pegs that flip. The object is to be the first player to turn over all your pegs by rolling dice. Players may add, subtract, multiply or divide the numbers they roll in order to get the number the combination that makes the number they need. 6 and up. (800) 621-5426. SNAP INFO: No special adaptation is needed for this excellent math game that can be used for beginners and beyond.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: 2002.

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2002 Award
Blink
(Out of the Box Publishing $8.95 Score:) "Again, let's play again!" was the shout of our testers to this cross between Go Fish and War. The object is to be the first to get rid of all of your cards by matching the top card on the two discard piles. You can match by color, shape, or number Calls for fast visual discrimination. Quick rounds and lads of fun.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: 2002.

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2002 Award
Buy It Right Shopping Game
(Learning Resources $19.95 Score:) Making change and shopping is not always clear to kids who don't get to handle more than their milk money at lunch. This game involves a lot of buying and selling and some flexible thinking. Kids roll three numeral dice and decide if they want to call a 4, 2, 1 $4.21 or $1.24...a choice that depends on if they are buying or selling. This comes with 100 realistic looking plastic coins and 40 play bills and a working calculator. Unlike a lot of mall shopping games aimed at girls, this is a gender free game that will be enjoyed by boys and girls. 6 & up.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: 2002.

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2003 Awards
Talking Clever Clock
(Learning Resources $34.95 Score:) Hands down, the best electronic clock for teaching kids how to tell time. Our nine-year old tester had given up on ever learning how to tell time-but within minutes he was having fun using the clock that has self-checking features with both digital and analog clock faces. He liked moving the hands of the clock to match the digital readout. There are buttons that will tell you the time out loud, along with quiz-and-answer buttons. 5 & up. If time is an issue in your house, look no further! SNAP: For kids with disabilities, having a clock that uses several senses may be a real plus. This clock talks and gives digital as well as analog read-outs. So it's a great learning tool for exploring telling time. Our tester liked setting the time and then pressing the button to hear the time said. The same company's non-electronic clock is less expensive and still a great choice, but hearing the time out loud may be worth the extra money. Activity: Set the clock for typical times when you eat, rise, go to bed, leave for school. Concentrate on the hour first and then the half hour. Minutes come after those are pinned down. Learning to tell time- takes time. As the old adage goes- Rome wasn't built in a day. To build interest you might want to consider one of the craft kit clocks that kids paint, as well. (888) 800-7893.

Age: Early School Years,Later School Years. Award Year: 2003.

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